Moments

Molding a Gift of Play-Doh into a Great Donation

Posted on Feb 01, 2019

Second-graders donate Play-Doh for patients
Second-graders donate Play-Doh for patients

The second-graders from the gifted class at Bay Vista Fundamental Elementary School shuffle in to Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital with hundreds of cans of Play-Doh in tow. Wagons and tubs fill and refill to transport hundreds of cans and more than 40 Play-Doh kits.

Play-Doh? Why is Play-Doh so important?

“Play-Doh is great for lots of reasons,” Child Life specialist Kelly Boyd says. “It allows patients of all ages the chance to be creative. We can also use it as a therapeutic tool to help kids express their feelings and better cope with their illness and hospital stay. Because of infection control procedures in the hospital setting, a can of Play-Doh can only be used by one patient and can’t be reused, so we need lots of Play-Doh. The more we have the more patients we can reach.”

Shelby Bassford, R.N., has a child in the class at Bay Vista, and when the school reached out about a service project to impact the community, Bassford connected them with Boyd, who suggested the class raise funds to purchase Play-Doh for hospital patients.

So, the kids got busy and organized a lemonade stand, which raised $367. They also received additional cash donations from family and friends for a total of about $500 to purchase the Play-Doh. Some more friends and classmates jumped onboard by donating new cans of Play-Doh to go along with the cash raised.

As the kids present their bountiful donation, each receives a personalized certificate from the Child Life Department and the thanks of a grateful hospital.


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