Johns Hopkins All Children's Research

Laszlo Nagy, M.D., Ph.D.

Co-Director of the Institute for Fundamental Biomedical Research, Associate Director of the Center for Metabolic Origins of Disease, and Professor, Medicine and Biological Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Department and Institute Affiliations

  • Institute for Fundamental Biomedical Research, Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital
  • Johns Hopkins Center for Metabolic Origins of Disease
  • Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Department of Biological Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Contact Information

Research and Education Building
600 Fifth Street S. 
St. Petersburg, FL 33701

P: 727-767-8928 
F: 727-767-8804 
E: lnagy@jhmi.edu

Administrative program coordinator:
Lorenzo Thomas
P: 727-767-8927
E: Lorenzo@jhmi.edu

Laboratory manager:
Tristan Hays, M.S.
P: 727-767-8934
E: thays4@jhmi.edu

Post-doctoral opportunities

Two fully funded post-doctoral research positions are available in the laboratory of Dr. Nagy in the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Institute for Fundamental Biomedical Research.

More information about requirements is available here. For more information or to apply, please contact Dr. Nagy at lnagy@jhmi.edu with a CV and names of three references.

Education

  • M.D., University Medical School of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary, 1991
  • Ph.D., University Medical School of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary, 1995

Overview

Dr. Nagy is a professor of medicine in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism in the Department of Medicine and biological chemistry at the Department of Biological Chemistry in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is the associate director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Metabolic Origins of Disease, a program that spans Johns Hopkins Medicine campuses in St. Petersburg, Florida, and Baltimore. He is also co-director of the Johns Hopkins All Children's Institute for Fundamental Biomedical Research. He has training as both a physician and as a molecular and cellular biologist.    

Dr. Nagy’s research focuses on identifying and understanding how the identity of cells develops and how their differentiation contributes to human diseases. He seeks to understand how the extra- and intracellular lipid environment contributes to cellular development and differentiation, and what impact that has on components of the immune system. In this context, Dr. Nagy also studies what causes cells to use certain pieces of genetic information and not others, and what causes that process to sometimes result in diseases such as chronic inflammation, tissue degeneration or cancer. Studying these questions while evaluating the entire genome makes it more likely to discover key changes related to a particular disease and to find reliable biomarkers to monitor that disease. Those answers may lead to better diagnoses and novel therapies.

Honors and Awards

Dr. Nagy is the recipient of numerous awards, including a Boehringer Ingelheim Research Award, a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship in Biomedical Sciences, and three consecutive Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Research Scholar Awards.

He is an elected member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), Academia Europaea and The Henry Kunkel Society.

Read more about Dr. Nagy's work:

Immunology Journal Features Work of Dr. Laszlo Nagy on Muscle Regeneration

Dr. Nagy’s research focuses on identifying ways to help tissue heal and regenerate. It’s research that could one day help to improve the quality of life for children with chronic inflammatory conditions.

Read More

 

Research Interests

Dr. Nagy's research interests include:

  • Transcriptional regulation via lipid activated transcription factors
  • Nuclear receptor regulation of organ homeostasis and metabolism
  • Epigenomic and transcriptional regulation of cell type specification
  • Epigenomic regulation of macrophage differentiation and function in injury and tissue repair
  • Molecular and cellular interactions during muscle regeneration in health and disease

Select Publications