Johns Hopkins All Children's Foundation

News

Donor Supports Life-Changing Learning


Posted on Dec 02, 2020

After becoming interested in the work of Nicole Chandler, M.D., pictured here, Dorothy Dunn created the Frank and Dorothy Szafer Dunn Surgical Oncology Research Fund.
After becoming interested in the work of Nicole Chandler, M.D., pictured here, Dorothy Dunn created the Frank and Dorothy Szafer Dunn Surgical Oncology Research Fund.

Long-time elementary school teacher Dorothy Dunn was passionate about shaping students’ lives through education. Her dedication to children’s well-being will long outlive her, thanks to the legacy she built.

A former resident of Sun City Center for many years, Dorothy died in December 2019 at age 90. During her extraordinary life, service to others was a guiding principle. She became an enthusiastic supporter of Johns Hopkins All Children’s Foundation through the establishment of charitable gift annuities.

In 2017, after becoming interested in the work of Nicole Chandler, M.D., FACS, FAAP, interim chief of the Division of Pediatric Surgery at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital and associate professor in the Department of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dorothy took her support a step further by creating the Frank and Dorothy Szafer Dunn Surgical Oncology Research Fund.

“Dorothy felt that Dr. Chandler’s work was a specialized area in which she could have a significant impact,” says Lydia Bailey, CFRE, assistant director of planned giving at the Foundation. “She was focused on helping our physicians continue to study, develop and implement best pediatric surgery practices.”

The Dream Continues

By making planned gifts, Dorothy joined the Dream Builders, a special group of donors who, by including the Foundation in their estate plans, develop a deep connection with the organization and the hospital services important to them. That was certainly true of Dorothy.

One afternoon in recent years, Chandler — whose interests include improving trauma care and recovery for patients, as well as decreasing surgical complications — visited Dorothy at home and showed her an example of the impact she’d had on children.

“We watched a video of a patient I helped care for who had cancer,” Chandler says. “Through some of our research and advancements, the patient recovered from surgery quickly and was back enjoying fishing. The Dunn legacy allows us to invest in the people who come to work with us to perform research in children and become leaders in surgery, and it has a direct effect on the patients and families in our care.”

To learn more about becoming a Dream Builder, visit PlannedGiving.HopkinsAllChildrens.org or call Bailey or Stephanie Wilson at 727-767-8914. This story first appeared in For the Kids, a magazine published by Johns Hopkins All Children’s Foundation.