Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital Heart Institute

Heart Transplant

We provide comprehensive, long-term care for our heart transplant patients.

Our heart transplant program has performed more than 185 neonatal and pediatric heart transplants for patients with congenital heart defects or acquired heart disease. Although we have placed our heart transplant program in a voluntary inactive status until we hire a new heart transplant surgeon, we continue to care for patients who have received transplant. These patients will continue to receive outpatient and inpatient care, including cardiac catheterization and biopsies.

The transplant coordinator arranges follow-up clinic visits, lab work and biopsies and helps with other needs. We help coordinate all of the medications your child will need and help our patients' primary care physicians understand the special health care needs of post-transplant patients to ensure continuity of care.

Our team helps the family and the patient become comfortable and confident with the medications and self-care that are needed after a heart transplant. Outpatient visits at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital take place frequently at first and gradually transition to just a few visits per year. The goal is for our transplant patients to become healthy and independent adults.

We offer ongoing patient and family education and support in the post-transplant years, including a patient/family support group. We help our post-transplant patients lead active and fulfilling lives as they prepare for their journey to adulthood. Because we know their unique medical and cardiac history, we continue to provide post-transplant cardiology and adult congenital heart disease services into adulthood.

Restoring Your Trust in Our Heart Institute

Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital is determined to learn everything that happened in the Heart Institute and to rebuild it in a way that earns your trust. We commit ourselves to updating you on our leadership transition, the lessons we learn through independent outside evaluation and our implementation of recommended changes. Johns Hopkins is proud and deeply committed to being a part of this community. We invite you to follow our journey, and we will not rest until your trust is restored.

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Meet Our Team

Our multidisciplinary team works together to meet your child's medical and developmental needs and provides you and your family with education and support.

Your Stay

 It’s a little easier when you know what to expect and where you will be staying. Our individual patient rooms can comfortably accommodate a child and both parents.

Read inspiring stories about our Heart Transplant patients:

Home Is Where the Heart Is

A mother, a hospital and a medical foster family help a child recover from a heart transplant and start life with loving support.

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One Heart Inspiring Another

For the past 14 years, Tina has been a patient care technician in the PICU at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital. A medical career, however, wasn’t something she’d planned on. In fact, it all started with the birth of her son, Nathan, who was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a critical birth defect affecting the formation of the heart. Originally from Germany, the family moved to Florida so Johns Hopkins All Children’s could care for Nathan’s heart.

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A Historic Heart Patient Maintains Devotion to Johns Hopkins All Children’s

At just six weeks old, Hunter Ratcliffe made history. Just hours after birth, Hunter’s family learned he was born with a congenital heart defect called hypoplastic left heart syndrome, which meant the left side of Hunter’s heart was missing and couldn’t pump oxygen-rich blood to the body properly. On June 19, 1995, he received the first heart transplant at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital...

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If the Third Time is the Charm, Maddie’s New Heart Transplant is Beating All Odds

While many teenage girls will happily tick off their favorite Instagram posts or all of the clubs they are in at school, Maddie is more likely to list out the number of beating hearts that have echoed inside her chest (three) or the hundreds of echocardiograms, multiple heart attacks and the many nights she has spent in the emergency room...

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